What Is The Use Of Carob And Can It Replace Chocolate

What Is The Use Of Carob And Can It Replace Chocolate
What Is The Use Of Carob And Can It Replace Chocolate

Video: What Is The Use Of Carob And Can It Replace Chocolate

Video: What is Carob and the Best Kind for Health Benefits? 2022, December
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Many people love chocolate, but for the sake of health and harmony they refuse sweets. Nutritionists say that carob, a delicacy that does not harm health, can replace chocolate. Is this so, let's try to figure it out.

carob
carob

Carob is called the fruit of the carob tree from the legume family that grows in South Africa, Argentina, Brazil, India and even Georgia. In appearance, carob pods resemble brown peas, measuring about 15-20 cm in length.

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The pods are collected, peeled, fried and ground. This is how a powder is obtained - fried carob. Carob pulp is used to produce gum, a well-known thickener used in yoghurt products.

The fruits of the carob tree in eastern countries are used to prepare liqueurs, syrups and compotes, and in Russia, carob has gained popularity precisely as a substitute for chocolate. Carob powder is similar in appearance to cocoa powder, but does not have a distinct coffee smell.

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The absence of caffeine and theobromine is precisely what makes carob a sweetness that does not cause addiction and problems with blood pressure, excess weight, and more. Carob is full of natural sugars: fructose, glucose, as well as minerals: potassium, sodium, calcium, magnesium and vitamins of groups A and E.

The low glycemic index allows people with diabetes mellitus to consume carob. As a hot drink, carob is prepared in the same way as cocoa - just dissolve a couple of tablespoons of powder in hot milk (water), bring to a boil and cool.

Carob can be made into candy and added to baked goods and desserts as an alternative to chocolate. Carob's nutritional fibers and the content of tannins (astringents) improve digestion, and the amino acid arginine, which is part of the composition, has a positive effect on the brain.

Like chocolate, carob triggers a rush of pleasure hormones. During periods of stress and increased physical activity, carob will help restore spent strength, improve blood circulation.

One hundred grams of dry product contains 40% carbohydrates, 15% fiber, 4% protein and 1% fat. The benefits of carob outweigh the benefits of chocolate and the fact that consumption of carob does not cause skin problems. Thus, those with a sweet tooth can substitute carob for chocolate without fear of acne.

In America, for example, unroasted carob powder is used to treat diarrhea and frequent regurgitation in infants. However, like any product, carob should be consumed in moderation, as some of its components, if overeating, can cause an allergic reaction.

People with fructose intolerance should also refrain from carob and consult a doctor about the possibility of eating this powder. In general, scientists praise the carob and argue that there are practically no contraindications (except for individual intolerance).

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